Board of Public Works Approves More Than $14 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Board of Public Works Approves More Than $14 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Press Release

Media Contacts:

Dawn Stoltzfus
editor.mde@maryland.gov

Jay Apperson
Jay.Apperson@maryland.gov

410-537-3003

Board of Public Works Approves More Than $14 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay Grants Will Reduce Nutrient and Sediment Pollution, Improve Infrastructure

(BALTIMORE, MARYLAND) May 4, 2011 – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $14.8 million in grants to reduce pollution and improve water quality by upgrading wastewater treatment plants and septic systems and improving stormwater management. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

“These projects significantly reduce nutrient pollution, improve our waterways and infrastructure, protect public health, and create jobs for our families,” said Governor O'Malley. “Together, we can ensure that our Bay remains vibrant and healthy for our children and theirs.”

The following projects were approved today in the following locations:

Damascus Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrade – Montgomery County

A $4,910,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, in addition to a previous $325,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant, will fund the planning, design, and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the existing 1.5 million gallons per day (mgd) Damascus Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrade the Damascus Wastewater Treatment Plant  will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62.5 percent and phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Middle Potomac River and ultimately to the Chesapeake Bay.

Cambridge Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal upgrade – Dorchester County

An $8,444,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant tothe City of Cambridge will help fund the planning, design, and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the existing 8.0 million gallons per day (mgd) Cambridge Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrade, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 63 percent and phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Choptank River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Upgrade Septic Systems – Statewide

Grants from the Bay Restoration Fund totaling as much as $905,000 will provide funding for counties to upgrade on-site sewage disposal (septic) systems to significantly reduce the discharge of nitrogen, the most serious pollutant in the Chesapeake Bay. Counties will focus on upgrading septic systems located within the Critical Area. The typical septic system does not remove nitrogen, instead delivering about 30 pounds of nitrogen per year to the groundwater. An upgraded, nitrogen-removing septic system cuts a system’s nitrogen load in half.Calvert, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s, Talbot, Somerset, and Worcester counties will benefit from the grants.

Olney Oaks Stormwater Management Pond Retrofit – Montgomery County

Capital construction grants of $31,811 to Montgomery County will fund the Olney Oaks Stormwater Management Pond Retrofit project. The project will increase the amount of time the pond holds stormwater to better treat stormwater and reduce polluted runoff. The drainage area to the pond is 397 acres.

New Windsor Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade – Town of New Windsor, Carroll County

Capital construction grants of $550,000 to the Town of New Windsor will fund the New Windsor Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade project. The project replaces the outdated lagoon system with a state-of-the-art Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) activated sludge system in order to meet new discharge permit limits. This upgrade will improve water quality to Dickenson Run and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay by reducing nitrogen and phosphorus discharge by a combined 11,060 pounds per year.

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