Board of Public Works Approves More Than $129 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Board of Public Works Approves More Than $129 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Press Release

Media Contacts:

Dawn Stoltzfus

Jay Apperson

410-537-3003

Board of Public Works Approves More Than $129 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay Grants Will Reduce Nutrient Pollution, Improve Infrastructure

BALTIMORE, MD (August 10, 2011) - The Maryland Board of Public Works approved more than $129 million in grants to reduce pollution and improve water quality by upgrading wastewater treatment plants and improving drinking water and sewage collection infrastructure. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, and Comptroller Peter Franchot.


“These projects significantly reduce nutrient pollution, improve our waterways and infrastructure, protect public health, and create jobs for our families. In particular, upgrades at the Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant, the single largest point source of nitrogen to the Chesapeake Bay, are an essential part of our plan to clean up the Potomac River and the Bay,” said Governor O'Malley. “Together, we can ensure that our Bay remains vibrant and healthy for our children and theirs.”

 

The following projects were approved today in the following locations:

Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Washington, D.C.

A $104 million Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission, in addition to a previous $2 million Bay Restoration Fund grant, will help fund the planning, design, and construction of the Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) upgrades at the existing 370 million gallons per day Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant. Blue Plains is the largest advanced wastewater treatment plant in the world. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged into the Potomac River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Parkway Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) Upgrade – Prince George’s County

A $16,053,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission will help fund the planning, design, and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the existing 7.5 million gallons per day Parkway Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62.5 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 70 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Patuxent River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Snow Hill Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Worcester County

A $3,016,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant, a $3,096,629 Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) grant, and a $1,543,000 Supplemental Assistance Program grant to the Town of Snow Hill – along with a previous $400,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant, a previous $549,631 BNR grant, and a previous $200,000 Supplemental Assistance Program grant – will help fund the planning, design, and construction of BNR and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the existing 0.5 million gallons per day Snow Hill WWTP. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 95 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Upper Pocomoke River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Towson Finished Water Reservoir Cover – Baltimore County

A Water Supply Financial Assistance Program grant totaling $1.5 million will help fund the construction of a finished water reservoir cover, along with ancillary improvements, to comply with a settlement agreement between the Maryland Department of Environment and the City of Baltimore to bring the reservoir into compliance with the a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule designed to improve drinking water quality and provide additional protection from contaminants. In addition, the reservoir’s usable storage volume will be increased from the current nine million gallons to 16 million gallons in order to provide flow equalization and emergency storage. 

Emmitsburg Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) Upgrade – Frederick County

Grant funding from the Bay Restoration Fund totaling $435,000 to the Town of Emmitsburg, in addition to a previous $50,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant, will help fund the planning, design, and construction of Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the 0.75 million gallons per day Emmitsburg Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrades, the facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 83 percent and its phosphorus discharge by 95 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Upper Monocacy and Potomac Rivers and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Vienna Smart Water Meters Replacement – Dorchester County

An $86,500 Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund “green infrastructure” grant to the Town of Vienna will help fund the Vienna Smart Water Meters Replacement project, which involves the replacement of all water meters within the town’s potable water distribution system. The existing water meters are aging and experiencing performance problems, and will be replaced by smart meters that help to conserve water. 

St. Michael’s Sewer Collection System Improvement Project – Talbot County

Supplemental Assistance Program grant funding totaling $67,310, along with a previous $605,000 Supplemental Assistance Program grant and a previous $450,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant, will help fund the rehabilitation of a portion of the St. Michael’s wastewater collection system. Defective sewer lines and manholes will be either repaired or replaced, and low-pressure sewers with grinder pumps will be installed to replace substantially deteriorated gravity sewers and other sewer rehabilitation techniques.The project will be completed in phases, and it is designed to remove major sources of pollution caused by infiltration and inflow in the wastewater collection system.

Maryland Correctional Institute Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) Upgrade – Washington County

A $48,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant to the Maryland Environmental Service will help fund the planning, design, and construction phases to upgrade the Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at the existing 1.6 million gallons per day Maryland Correctional Institute Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the upgrades, the nitrogen discharge will be reduced by 62.5 percent and phosphorus discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing the amount of nutrients discharged into Antietam Creek and, ultimately, to the Chesapeake Bay.

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