Board of Public Works Approves $2.96 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

Press Release

Maryland Department of the Environment

Media Contact

Kim Lamphier or Jay Apperson
(410) 537-3003

Board of Public Works Approves $2.96 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND (March 24, 2010) – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved $2.96 million in grants to reduce pollution and improve water quality by upgrading wastewater treatment plants and collection systems, and drinking water systems. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

"These projects significantly reduce nitrogen pollution, provide safe drinking water, and put people to work across the state," said Governor Martin O'Malley.

The following projects were approved in the following locations:

Havre de Grace Infiltration and Inflow Reduction – Harford County

This $166,500 Sewer Rehabilitation Grant from the Bay Restoration Fund will improve the wastewater collection system including repair and/or replacement of defective sewer lines and manholes. When complete, the upgrades will reduce overflows and the resulting pollution.

LaPlata Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Charles County

This $500,000 grant from the Bay Restoration Fund, in addition to a previous grant of $110,000, will fund the planning, design, and construction of Enhanced Nutrient Removal facilities at the existing LaPlata Wastewater Treatment Plant. After the ENR upgrade, the LaPlata Wastewater Treatment Plant will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62 percent and phosphorous discharge by 85 percent. These improvements will reduce sanitary sewer overflows and the resulting discharge of nutrients into the Port Tobacco River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Piney Point Sewer Repairs/Replacement – St. Mary’s County

This $500,000 Sewer Rehabilitation Grant from the Bay Restoration Fund will fund the rehabilitation of a deteriorated 60-year-old sewage collection system including relining, replacing, and repairing of pipes and manholes and other system components as necessary to improve performance. Once complete, the new, more efficient system will reduce pollution into the Potomac River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Thurmont Sewer Line Rehabilitation – Frederick County

This $1 million Sewer Rehabilitation Grant from the Bay Restoration Fund, in addition to a previous State grant of $400,000, will fund rehabilitation of the Town’s wastewater collection system, including the repair and/or replacement of defective sewer lines and manholes and the construction of ancillary facilities. Once complete, the upgrades will benefit the Town by reducing the amount of inflow/ infiltration in the existing sewage collection system. These improvements will reduce sanitary sewer overflows and the resulting discharge of nutrients into the Monacacy River and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.

Woolford-Madison Sanitary Sewer Project – Dorchester County

This $300,000 State Water Quality Grant, in addition to a previous state grant of $700,000, over $2 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and over $6.5 million in additional Federal grants, will fund the design and construction of a low-pressure wastewater collection system and regional pumping stations to replace failing septic systems in the Madison-Woolford areas of Dorchester County. This new wastewater collection system will protect drinking water in individual wells and eliminate failed septic system pollution currently affecting Woolford Creek, Fishing Creek and Madison Bay, all which flow into the Choptank River.

Grantsville North & East Water Extension – Garrett County

This $500,000 grant, in addition to over $1 million from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and $255,000 from the State Highway Administration, will extend public water service to recently annexed areas presently served by individual wells on the north and east sides of town. The project will extend public water service to 70 homes and six businesses and improve the water supply to the Goodwill Mennonite Nursing Home, which has 98 beds, 22 apartments, and is building 30 cottages.

 

###