Board of Public Works Approves $19.8 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

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Maryland Department of the Environment

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Kim Lamphier or Jay Apperson
(410) 537-3003

Board of Public Works Approves $19.8 Million in Grants for Clean Water and the Chesapeake Bay

(Baltimore, Maryland) June 9, 2010 – The Maryland Board of Public Works approved $19,833,443 million in grants to reduce pollution and improve water quality by upgrading wastewater treatment plants and septic systems, controlling stormwater, and improving drinking water systems. The Board is composed of Governor Martin O’Malley, Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, and Comptroller Peter Franchot.

"These projects significantly reduce nitrogen pollution, control polluted stormwater runoff, provide safe drinking water, and put people to work across the state," said Governor Martin O'Malley.

The grants approved by the Board of Public Works include more than $4 million to Maryland counties to upgrade septic systems. Of the approximately 420,000 septic systems in Maryland, 52,000 are in the “Critical Area,” land within 1,000 feet of tidal waters that is vital for water quality and wildlife habitat.

"Upgrading Maryland's septic systems, particularly in the Critical Area, will help Maryland meet our goals for a healthier Chesapeake Bay,” Governor O’Malley said.

The following projects were approved in the following locations:

Upgrade Septic Systems – Statewide

Grants totaling $4,058,000 will provide funding for counties to upgrade on-site sewage disposal (septic) systems to significantly reduce the discharge of nitrogen, the most serious pollutant in the Chesapeake Bay. Counties will focus on upgrading septic systems located within the Critical Area. The typical septic system does not remove nitrogen, instead delivering about 30 pounds of nitrogen per year to the groundwater. An upgraded, nitrogen-removing septic system cuts a system’s nitrogen load in half.

Maryland City Water Reclamation Facility Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Anne Arundel County
A $500,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant will fund the planning, design, and construction of the Enhanced Nutrient Removal facilities at the existing 2.5 million-gallon-per-day (mgd) Maryland City Water Reclamation Facility. After the upgrade, the Maryland City Water Reclamation Facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62 percent and phosphorous discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Upper Patuxent River and ultimately to the Chesapeake Bay.

Broadwater Water Reclamation Facility Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Anne Arundel County
A $650,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant will fund the planning, design, and construction of the Enhanced Nutrient Removal facilities at the existing 2 million-gallon-per-day (mgd) Maryland City Water Reclamation Facility. After the upgrade, the Broadwater Water Reclamation Facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62 percent and phosphorous discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Upper Patuxent River and ultimately to the Chesapeake Bay.

Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Anne Arundel County
A $140,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant, in addition to a previous Bay Restoration Fund grant of $200,000, will fund the planning, design, and construction of the Enhanced Nutrient Removal facilities at the existing 6 million-gallon-per-day (mgd) Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility and expansion of the plant to 8 mgd. After the upgrade, the Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62 percent and phosphorous discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Lower Western Shore and ultimately to the Chesapeake Bay.

Aberdeen Wastewater Treatment Plant Enhanced Nutrient Removal Upgrade – Harford County
A $13,282,000 Bay Restoration Fund grant, in addition to a previous Bay Restoration Fund grant of $1,700,000, will fund the planning, design, and construction of the Enhanced Nutrient Removal facilities at the existing 4 million-gallon-per-day (mgd) Aberdeen Water Reclamation Facility and expansion of the plant to 8 mgd. After the upgrade, the Aberdeen Water Reclamation Facility will reduce its nitrogen discharge by 62 percent and phosphorous discharge by 85 percent, significantly reducing nutrients discharged to the Chesapeake Bay.

Brampton Hills Stream Stabilization – Howard County
This $529,000 Small Creek and Estuaries Restoration Grant, in addition to $579,272 in Transportation Enhancement Program Funds, will restore 2,100 linear feet of Bramhope Lane stream channel and repair the Maryland State Highway Administration drainage swale/ditch that discharges runoff from Route 100. Once complete, the project will reduce stormwater runoff and sediment pollution into the stream, the Little Patuxent River, and ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.

Upper Gwynns Falls Stormwater Management – Baltimore County
This $500,000 Stormwater Pollution Grant will convert approximately five existing stormwater management ponds, which control stormwater from about 170 acres of urban development, to shallow wetland systems. Once complete, the wetlands will remove more nitrogen and phosphorous and reduce stormwater runoff and sediment pollution into the Gwynns Falls and ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.

Waverly Woods Area 1, Section 1 Stormwater Management Retrofit – Howard County
This $149,721 Stormwater Pollution Grant will replace the existing, corroded discharge pipe and riser. Once complete, the new ponds will remove more nitrogen and phosphorous and reduce stormwater runoff and sediment pollution into the local stream, the Little Patuxent River and ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.

Christ Rock Public Water Service – Cambridge, Dorchester County
This $24,722 Water Supply Grant, in addition to a previous $450,000 Water Supply Grant, will connect approximately 47 households, which are in the Priority Funding Area, to the City of Cambridge’s water distribution system. The grant funds will enable the City of Cambridge to alleviate serious health issues related to failing septic tanks and water systems by extending much needed safe, public drinking water to this area.



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