Charles County Gets Assistance for Enhancement of Wastewater Plant's Nutrient Reduction System

Press Release

Maryland Department of the Environment
Media Contact:
Richard McIntire
(410) 537-3012
(410) 716-8784-Pager

Charles County Gets Assistance for Enhancement of Wastewater Plant's Nutrient Reduction System

ANNAPOLIS, MD (November 21, 2002) – Governor Parris N. Glendening yesterday announced Board of Public Works approval of a $1.26 million grant for Charles County to upgrade its Mattawoman Wastewater Treatment Plant.

“We are taking aggressive action to protect and preserve our precious Chesapeake Bay while improving the quality of life for all Marylanders,” said Governor Glendening. “This project is consistent with Maryland’s commitment to reduce the amount of nutrients being discharged to the Chesapeake Bay, improving aquatic habitat in that irreplaceable jewel that is the centerpiece of our State.”

The grant will be used to boost the biological nutrient removal (BNR) facility at the plant, improving its ability to remove nitrogen from treated water. Once complete, the plant will be able to remove nitrogen to a seasonal average level of 8 milligrams per liter before discharging to Potomac River.

On Nov. 14, Governor Glendening announced an Enhanced Nutrient Removal policy established by Executive Order that will utilize technological advances in BNR to enhance Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay region-leading nutrient reduction program by preventing an additional 7.5 million pounds of nitrogen and 220,000 pounds of phosphorus from entering the Bay from wastewater treatment plants each year. Excess nutrients lead to degraded water quality, which negatively impact the ecology of the Bay and its tributaries.

“Charles County Government desires to improve the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay by reducing the amount of nutrients being discharged from its swage treatment plant,” said Charles County Administrator Eugene T. Lauer. “We look forward to working with the Maryland Department of the Environment on this endeavor.”

The total cost of the project is more than $7.9 million, of which $3.1 million is the local share of the cost. The Maryland Department of the Environment, through its Water Quality Infrastructure Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others will assist the town with additional grants to round out funding of the project.



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